How To Use In-Camera HDR

By now, you should be familiar with how and when you should be taking HDR photos. It’s a great way to preserve a lot of the information in a scene’s highlights and shadows, and can come in handy more often than you’d think.

We have also mentioned what programs can be used to merge photos into an HDR image. Programs like Aurora HDR (www.aurorahdr.com) and Photoshop can be used for the purpose. However, most people don’t realize that their cameras might have the ability to shoot HDR photos automatically.

 

In-Camera HDR is Easy

First of all, you need to know if your camera supports creating HDR images by itself or not. If it does, you’re in luck. Simply choose the HDR mode, set the parameters like the number of brackets to be shot, and click the shutter to get an almost instant HDR photo. It is important to actually know when you should use this function, however.

HDR photos are best for landscape or architectural shots where there are extreme highlights and extreme shadows in your scene. This especially helps when your subject is backlit. Also, keep in mind that you’ll need to keep your camera very steady to use the in-camera HDR functionality to make sure that your photos are overlapped with one another perfectly.

In-Camera vs. Off-Camera

While HDRs taken directly inside the camera are great and can really help when you’re in a pinch, creating them with a dedicated software on your computer is obviously going to prove much more effective if you want the best possible detail and quality. That is because, in a dedicated HDR editor, you can tweak the images exactly how you want them and showcase various details just as you want them.

Despite that, it’s always handy to have an HDR functionality baked right into your camera for those quick shots that you simply don’t have the time to process later on.